Tagged: film

Video: Trootcottoun

Movie poster for Trootcottoun
Movie poster for Trootcottoun

In the summer of 2002, I made a short film!  I wrote it and directed it (and Rian Bosak shot pretty much all the tricky bits as my DP!), and edited it all in about… 3 weeks? 4 weeks?  Something like that.  It wasn’t very long, anyway.

It’s a fake documentary about a small fishing town in the UK.  I used to have a DVD that I was selling of it, but let’s just share it all up here!  So, beneath the cut, here’s the complete short.  It’s about 20 minutes long.  Little shorter.  YAAAAY!  Later, I’ll also post the commentary version.  And if you want to read along, or read instead, the script is also included!

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50 Outstanding Movies, Vol. 2011

There are the 50 Best Movies I saw for the first time, or practically the first time, in 2011. There are a few I had technically seen before, but either couldn’t remember them at all, or felt that I experienced them in a new way, so those are still included. Please enjoy. Both the article, and all 50 movies.

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An Open Letter To Netflix

A Netflix envelope picture taken by BlueMint.

Image via Wikipedia

Dear Netflix,

Are you stupid?

No, seriously, are you stupid?  I really wanna know.  Because, y’know, it seems that the way you’re acting, it seems that you’re stupid.

Not just a little stupid, but big full-on stupid.  Like “DUR DURR DURRRR” stupid.  Like tattoos on your hands saying “inhale” and “exhale”, only with those words crossed out and replaced with “breathe in” and “breathe out” stupid.

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Review: He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not

Audrey Tautou

Image via Wikipedia

Before I get started, this review contains a lot of spoilers for He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not. Do not continue past the cut if you care about such things. I originally had these all in ROT13, but that does get a little annoying to read and go between. So, instead, I’m just going to mention that there’s loads of spoilers, and let people either read or not read as the case may be.
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Review: I Think We’re Alone Now

tiffanyI’ve wanted to see I Think We’re Alone Now since I watched the trailer online with my friend Josh when I went to New York last February.  The documentary follows a couple of die-hard fans of Tiffany (the singer from the ‘80s who first made her career by touring malls rather than conventional venues).  The trailer was pretty amusing, and while I definitely wanted to see the full feature, I was a little afraid that it was going to play it for laughs, making fun of outsiders and folks who are a little weird.

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Interview: Paul B. Germain

2953366642_a971c95fcd_mPaul B. Germain is a fantastic documentarian.  His first feature, Speedy Delivery, is a look at David Newell, Director of Public Relations of Family Communications, Inc. — or, as you might know him better, Mr. McFeely, the jovial delivery man from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.  The film is also proof — if you needed any — that both Mr. Newell and Mr. Rogers are exactly as kind and loving in real life as they are on television.  Paul’s film is amazing, and is wonderful for anyone who grew up with the Neighborhood, or, in other words, just about all of us.  I was very glad I could meet Paul — another kind and loving man — and talk to him about his excellent film, and I can’t wait for his upcoming projects!

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Things That Are Neat: The Concept Of Persistence Of Vision!

CRT monochrome
CRT monochrome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m big into film, and so I sort of have to think this is neat.  But even if I wasn’t, I’d still think it’s pretty cool, since it’s your brain putting together a series of stills together and presenting it to you as motion and you don’t even know!  Or, well, you know, but you can’t tell unless you actually take a look at each individual image.  Which is pretty cool.  I mean, I suppose this could probably go under the TV section since TV’s got the same principle going on but persistence of vision is so neat it deserves credit on its own.

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Film Review: Funeral Parade Of Roses

Funeral Parade of Roses

Image via Wikipedia

Funeral Parade of Roses is Toshio Matsumoto‘s first feature-length film, after finding much success in the world of short films and documentaries. This film is a huge influence on Stanley Kubrick‘s adaptation of A Clockwork Orange — a double feature of the two films would be very interesting, despite the different subject matter.
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The Isaac Hayes Experience

Isaac Hayes has probably been the greatest discovery I’ve made since my record collecting took a turn for the serious. Not being familiar with anything by the Black Moses I was blown away by the two songs included in the filmDead Presidents” (highly recommended film!). “The Look of Love” & “Walk on By” have both been sampled and would probably catch any Hip Hop head off guard ? but these tracks are completely mind blowing on their own and after finding the mp3s I knew that I had to track down these records by any means necessary.

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Atheism

Cover of "The God Who Wasn't There"
Cover of The God Who Wasn’t There

As many of you probably know, I’m also available on LiveJournal, and on that site, I’m a member — mainly as a lurker — of a number of communities. One of them is critical of Christian fundamentalism, though (typically) from people without a generally-critical-of-religion viewpoint. (It does get a little refreshing to see people talking about the content, rather than just a general “You believe differently than me so you’re obviously wrong” type of statement.)

A while ago, someone posted a link to The God Who Wasn’t There, a recent documentary looking at the historical accuracy of the Bible, whether or not there was a historical Jesus, and all that sorta stuff. Apparently, it was posted to Google Video — I’m not sure if it was the full film or an edited down “Greatest Hits” version or not — I didn’t follow the link since I’d actually already seen the DVD.

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